Welcome
Welcome to goprouser

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest, which gives you full access to view most discussions and access.. By joining our free community, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content, and access many other special features. In addition, registered members also see less advertisements if any. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free, so please, join our community today! Any issues email [email protected]

Go pro in surgery

Gopro User forum. This Old Forum is unlocked but ARCHIVED

Re: Go pro in surgery

Postby atom » Wed Jan 11, 2012 9:59 am

when they announced the details about the HD2 having a glass lens, i asked tech-support about the case lens... as best as i remember they said the case lens is still plastic. of course i can't find that email, now.

tapping on my case lenses they all sound like plastic.

it's possible that the replacement lenses are glass but the original lenses are plastic, or the web-site is wrong... or that i'm wrong.

a smashed lens would tell the story, if anyone has one...?
User avatar
atom
 
Posts: 1139
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2011 2:52 am

Re: Go pro in surgery

Postby atom » Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:02 am

Rambo wrote:Put the lens to your lips, is cold, is glass. Put the plastic case to your lips, is warm, is plastic.

based on that test, yeah... even my 960s seem to have glass lenses.

of course they could still have coatings that might be damaged by alcohol or stained by iodine.
User avatar
atom
 
Posts: 1139
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2011 2:52 am

Re: Go pro in surgery

Postby Rambo » Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:07 am

atom wrote:
Rambo wrote:Put the lens to your lips, is cold, is glass. Put the plastic case to your lips, is warm, is plastic.

based on that test, yeah... even my 960s seem to have glass lenses.

of course they could still have coatings that might be damaged by alcohol or stained by iodine.


atom, no coatings, no nothing, just plain optical glass. The only coatings are on the camera lens itself.

it's possible that the replacement lenses are glass but the original lenses are plastic, or the web-site is wrong... or that i'm wrong.


You are wrong, original and replacement are GLASS mate.
User avatar
Rambo
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7358
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:34 pm
Location: Mooloolaba, Qld Au

Re: Go pro in surgery

Postby Greg_E » Wed Jan 11, 2012 2:46 pm

UV sterilization for the outside of the housing. Put the camera in the housing after the UV treatment. The UV will eventually make the housing brittle and yellow, but it should last for dozens of surgeries. Not sure what a UV "autoclave" will cost so it may not be an option, but it should work really well. UV and Ozone treatment would also work well, but again the Ozone will help the plastic degrade so only do this with the empty housing and pay attention to see when it gets brittle.
http://transportcontrols.com
Updated with version 1.
User avatar
Greg_E
 
Posts: 1646
Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2010 7:39 am

Re: Go pro in surgery

Postby peter nap » Wed Jan 11, 2012 3:32 pm

You keep coming up with surprises Greg!
You ain't always right, but you're in the high 90's. :lol:

As far as the case degradation, assuming it is UV stabilized, which it almost has to be, will it still become brittle?
peter nap
 
Posts: 1144
Joined: Wed Nov 24, 2010 2:00 am

Re: Go pro in surgery

Postby Greg_E » Fri Jan 13, 2012 1:56 pm

I would still expect the UV to degrade the plastic in time, it's strong UV so I would expect it to still cause some sort of damage if the plastic is exposed long enough (or enough times. Might just yellow or might get brittle. I definitely wouldn't send the camera through though, I would expect the ABS to break down in fairly short order in a UV sterilization rig.

All that said I'm not sure how effective the UV riggs really are, steam and heat still seem to be the choice for most instruments. I know a person that works in the video department at one of the teaching hospitals here, they don't really do to much to try and sterilize the camera for surgery, I think mostly they just wrap it in fresh plastic so that anything that falls off the camera is contained in the plastic.
http://transportcontrols.com
Updated with version 1.
User avatar
Greg_E
 
Posts: 1646
Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2010 7:39 am

Re: Go pro in surgery

Postby t1d » Sat Jan 14, 2012 1:12 pm

After you have sterilized the case the best that you can, you could put it in a sterilized glove that has a hole cut out for the lense. I have read that you can see the displays through the thin latex. Same as Greg_E's idea about wrapping it in plastic, but maybe one step up on sterilization, availability and ease of use.
t1d
 
Posts: 199
Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 2:36 pm

Re: Go pro in surgery

Postby VetsTail » Mon Jan 16, 2012 9:08 am

t1d wrote:After you have sterilized the case the best that you can, you could put it in a sterilized glove that has a hole cut out for the lense. I have read that you can see the displays through the thin latex. Same as Greg_E's idea about wrapping it in plastic, but maybe one step up on sterilization, availability and ease of use.


I have to say this is a really simple and effective idea. I wish I had thought of it!

Thankyou everyone for the input, I will let you know how my tests play out and post the footage as soon as I get a chance!
http://www.VetsTail.com
User avatar
VetsTail
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 10:25 pm

Re: Go pro in surgery

Postby mrkrag » Wed Feb 08, 2012 7:06 am

I work as an orthopedic physicians assistant, and was also considering trying my GoPro for recording surgery. We already record most of our cases via 3 ceiling mounted security-type cameras that have pan/tilt and incredible zoom. But there are times where either our heads, hands, or flouro machine obscure the picture. The GoPro seems a great solution for up close shots such as that.
Here's my take on it:
-The housing is plastic, and can not withstand an autoclave. So the lens being glass is irrelevant.
-You COULD, however, run it through a Steris machine. Whether or not this would be considered sufficient level of sterilization to be on your back table or not will be up to the facility and the Dr.
-You also could run it through a Sterrad. They use much lower temperatures as they disinfect with radiation instead of temperature.
-If shooting up close, as I would be, the brightness of the lights shouldnt be an issue if the whole view is the brightly lit surgical field. Now if you try to capture further back, to include the personnel, you would have to go with spot metering. That would get the field to at least be visible, but at the expense of darkening the people. I film our open cases with the overhead cameras all the time, even with all 3 lights pointed down into the field, when I zoom to fill the screen it looks fine. Once I zoom back more, say far enough to include the table, what is in the field becomes just whited out as the cameras balance to include the rest of the room.
-You would have to provide the housing(s) to the facility ahead of time to have them sterilized. Steris takes 35 minutes to run, but has to be done just before case time as there is no way to keep it sterile once the machine is opened. Sterrad needs at least 6 hours from when you need it, but would be the best option as it would come to the room in a sterile wrapper just like all of the instrument trays.
-Sterile housing opened out onto your back table with the rest of the instruments. NON-sterile camera would then have to be dropped into the case by your circulator, much like some of the batteries for cordless surgical drills have to be put into cases.
-As long as you can make the handoff and close up the housing without contaminating, you now have a sterile camera that you can use at the field like any other instrument.

I had considered the suction mount to one of the overhead lights(with a safety lanyard, just in case), using the forehead strap, or using a microphone stand with boom to hold it in from the side. After playing around with my GoPro for a while now, and my previous experiences recording other surgeries, none of these options seemed to work. For one, keeping things in the shot. You will either have a wide angle 170deg view and get it all in there but it will look small and far away, or you can get the 90deg view which reduces distortion and brings things closer but now how do you know if its in frame?
With the overhead cameras we use now, I have the remote for the pan/tilt/zoom in a sterile pouch and have a monitor on the wall where I can see what I am filming. Even with that, as we work on a hand or wrist case, the subject is always ending up out of frame. As we work and move the limb around, it goes out of the shot and I have to readjust the cameras. Having one in a fixed location, with no preview monitor (even the LCD BacPac would be facing the wrong way) I am sure things would constantly fall out of the shot.

Anyway, I hope this may be help to the OP. Check with your Dr and facility about if having a few housings wrapped and done up sterile is an option for you.
User avatar
mrkrag
 
Posts: 48
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2012 7:15 am
Location: Palm Harbor FL, USA

PreviousNext

Return to Old Forum Topics - Tips, Tricks and DIY Customizations - ALL Models

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron
suspicion-preferred